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hong  
#1 Posted : Saturday, December 7, 2019 12:22:29 PM(UTC)
hong

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Adaptability and the exploration mindset - from fixed to growth and innovator's mindsets

We recommend parents to read the following article from Dr Mike Moss FRSC FRSA, Oxford University Alumni Careers Programme Manager. 

Adults with a growth mindset do not necessarily pass on a growth mindset to their children. Parents who show concern, anger or emotion at a poor test result, do not build a growth mindset in their children. Parents who respond positively to a poor test result and express confidence that the score will be be better next time with a bit more effort, can instil a growth mindset in their children. This is complicated, 98% of teachers feel that growth mindset approaches should be adopted in schools, but only 50% said that they knew of strategies to effectively change a student’s mindset. The word yet is important. A low score in a test is not a “fail” it is just “not a pass yet”.

Interesting? read the whole article below.

Adaptability and the exploration mindset

The idea of the growth mindset, or even better the Innovator’s mindset, is based on the work of psychologist Carol Dweck at Stanford University. In the experiment, a group of 10 to 12 year olds were divided into two groups. All were told they achieved a high score on a test but members of the first group were praised for their intelligence, while the other group was praised for their effort. The second group were more likely to put effort into future tasks than the first group. Praising ability actually made the first group of students perform worse.

Based on this research three mindsets have been defined, here we look at how the three mindsets view challenges, obstacles and setbacks, hard work and effort, negative feedback and the success of others:

The Fixed Mindset:

  • Challenges are avoided to maintain the appearance of intelligence
  • Giving up in the face of obstacles and setbacks is a common response
  • Having to try or put in effort is viewed as a negative, if you have to try, you’re not very smart
  • Negative feedback regardless of how constructive is ignored
  • Other people’s success is viewed as a threat and evokes feelings of insecurity

The Growth Mindset

  • Challenges are embraced stemming from a desire to learn
  • Showing perseverance in the face of obstacles and setbacks is a common response
  • Doing hard work and putting in effort paves the path to achievement and success
  • Criticism provides important feedback that can aid in learning
  • Other people’s success can be a source of inspiration and education

The Innovator’s Mindset

  • Challenges are sought out, and seen as an opportunity for growth and development
  • When obstacles arise, the thinking is shifted to look for opportunities and possibilities
  • Hard work and effort are continuous, make time to create new solutions/ideas for growth
  • Criticism provides important feedback, the opportunity to implement new and better ideas
  • Other people’s success is learned from, something we modify and apply in our own context

Adults with a growth mindset do not necessarily pass on a growth mindset to their children. Parents who show concern, anger or emotion at a poor test result, do not build a growth mindset in their children. Parents who respond positively to a poor test result and express confidence that the score will be be better next time with a bit more effort, can instil a growth mindset in their children. This is complicated, 98% of teachers feel that growth mindset approaches should be adopted in schools, but only 50% said that they knew of strategies to effectively change a student’s mindset. The word yet is important. A low score in a test is not a “fail” it is just “not a pass yet”.

It is trendy to celebrate failure at the moment, in the start-up world the mantra is “fail fast, fail often”. In the researcher community at Oxford there has been a movement to break a taboo around failure, which I agree with, but we should not go too far. I would still prefer to call a failure a setback on the way to success, just to make sure that this is not the end of something.

As technology changes the way we work, adaptability to change is often cited as a major indicator of career success. In the literature the growth/innovator mindset encouraged in children becomes the exploration mindset of adults. One of the best ways to improve adaptability to change is to develop and maintain an exploration mindset, very similar to the innovator mindset described above. Personally, I take the view that it is part of human nature to resist change, which means one must always be working hard to maintain an exploration mindset and a positive attitude to change.

One of the biggest barriers to maintaining an exploration mindset is being successful. When we succeed at something we are tempted to think that we have got all of the answers and at that point, if we are not careful, we fall into a fixed mindset. Blockbuster Video was founded by David Cook in 1985 with a VHS video shop model. Netflix was founded in 1997 by Reed Hastings on the internet, mailing lighter DVDs, then eventually streaming. In 2000 Hastings went to the Blockbuster CEO and offered to manage their on-line business for them. The CEO, with millions of customers and thousands of existing stores scoffed at the suggestion. By 2007 Netflix had grown to more than $1 billion revenue and by 2018 more than $16 billion. Blockbuster video essentially folded in 2010. We see this fixed mindset in organisations that get disrupted. In Brian May’s words “the [person] who learned how to teach then forgot how to learn”.

It is important to recognise that adaptability to change is not passive. It is not just accepting change. The best examples of adaptability to change, will be driving change, helping others to be adaptable to change.

We can break adaptability down in to two steps, being “in-touch” and being “agile” to take action on new insights quickly and appropriately. Being “in-touch” means setting up your knowledge gathering systems, e-alerts from technology, science, think tanks and institutions, following other in-touch individuals on twitter. Being the first to hear about new developments in the area of interest and general areas of interest such as technology and policy. In the face of new developments being willing to unlearn treasured insights from the past. Always making an effort give a fair hearing to new and challenging information. As Bill Gates points out “I think if you’re in science you learn to be good at being self critical and questioning your assumptions.” Then taking action, all disruptive innovation starts out small, in 1991 there was one website, in 1992 there were 10, in 1993 - 130, in 1994 - 2,738, in 1995 - 23,500. Despite these numbers being small versus the more than 1.7 billion websites today, the growth by a factor of 10 every year is, by definition, exponential growth. The reason why Bill Gates dropped out of college early in 1975 was because the Altair 8800 build-your-own microcomputer kits went on sale early that year. At that time most computer hobbyists were more into hardware than software and Gates saw a chance for pole position in software development. This was the spark that ignited the microcomputer revolution - the Altair 8800 had an Intel central processing unit and, within months, software from Micro-Soft that later became Microsoft, timing was everything.

During the research to remain in-touch we reach a critical mass, we reach a point where we are no longer a specialist, knowing a lot about a little, nor a jack-of-all-trades who knows a little about a lot. By researching broad and deep in and around our sector, taking an interest in the big picture of our suppliers and their suppliers, our customers and their customers and our competitors of all scales, markets and platforms, we become an “expert generalist” knowing a lot about a lot. Maintaining an exploration mindset, being in-touch and agile, we are ready for whatever the future has to throw at us.

Edited by user Saturday, December 7, 2019 7:13:35 PM(UTC)  | Reason: Not specified

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hong  
#2 Posted : Saturday, December 7, 2019 12:27:32 PM(UTC)
hong

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Groups: AcademicCoachingSchool, admin, Administration, BookSeller, CatholicSchool, CoachingAdult, CoachingProfessional, CoachingSports, ExtraCurriculumCoaching, IndependentSchool, Moderator, MusicTeacher, PrivateSchool, PublicSchool, SelectiveSchool, tutor
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